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Going Against the Grain: Firms Disrupting the Status Quo

July 24, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

Architecture is a long-standing profession, one that has produced the iconic landmarks we admire around the world, monuments which we revere around the world, and played a part in establishing the organisation of the cities we live in today. This description, however, is architecture in the traditional sense – and there are numerous examples of individuals and firms who have strayed away from traditional architectural practice, either through delving into adjacent fields or ‘disrupting’ the field with the harnessing of new technologies.

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The Pervasive Influence of Swahili Architecture

July 18, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

The African continent has been – throughout history – a key player in the ever-evolving story of human migration. Cultures and customs have been shared, adapted, and re-imagined as a result of this movement of populaces, and architectural styles are no exception. In a way, the varied architecture present in Africa is a lens one can look at to understand the intricacies of migration. Present on the continent are ancient indigenous and building typologies born out of the organic assimilation of cultures. Also present are remnants of colonial architecture, a legacy not of voluntary migration, but of forced colonial imposition.

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Cities Within Cities: Chinatown Around The World

July 10, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

The global landscape of today has been moulded by centuries and centuries of human migration. This movement of people, of individuals and communities travelling far away from their place of origin to eke out better lives for themselves, has seen the evolution of the architectural and urban character of cities – moulded by the diverse influences fuelled by migration. This has meant that around the world, enclaves have popped up in cities, migrants carving out spaces for themselves which have a different character to other areas of a city.

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“Many Architects Think as They Draw. I Don’t Do That”: In Conversation With Mikkel Frost

July 3, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

Talking to the Louisiana Channel, Danish architect Mikkel Frost, talks about how he visualises his ideas and represents his architectural concepts – through the mediums of pen, ink and watercolours. Frost views his use of drawing as different from other architects, who “think as they draw”. Frost, on the other hand, “prints” the image he already has in his mind, saying “I’m many steps ahead of what I draw, basically printing the whiteboard in my mind.”

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A Balancing Act: How Architectural Tourism Can Be More Sustainable

June 26, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

The world of travelling is a multifaceted one. There are the everyday trips one takes for work or school, commuting to a set location during the week, usually within the confines of a city. There are the longer trips too, the trips which usually involve getting into an aeroplane to visit someplace a bit farther from where the traveller usually resides. These trips are frequently done for business purposes, but for those who have the means to afford it, these trips are undertaken for learning and leisure – where the traveller can be defined as a “tourist”.

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Does Automation Take Away From the Individuality of Design?

June 19, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

We’re in an age of unprecedented technological innovation. The architecture and construction industries are increasingly becoming more and more automated, as firms seek to take full advantage of new machinery and new ways of working to make the design process more efficient. With this increase in automation, however, comes lots of questions too. Will robots ever replace architects? Will the near future see a fully automated construction industry? A pertinent question, too, is the complicated case of automation and the individuality of design – does automation take away from the individuality of design?

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The Aesthetics of Automation: Examining the Appearance of 3D Printed Affordable Housing

June 12, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

The viability of 3D Printing in architecture – has, at the very least – seen a seismic shift over the past few years. Usually relegated to prototypes or conceptual models, 3D Printed building designs are increasingly being actualised as physical projects. In 2013, WinSun, a Chinese company – was able to print 10 houses in a 24-hour period, becoming one of the first companies to achieve this feat using 3D Printing technology. More recently, in 2018, a family in France became the first in the world to live in a 3D Printed house. The city of Dubai is also seeking to have a quarter of its buildings be 3D Printed by 2025. These examples display the upwards category of this technology, and how it is very likely, as the years go by, this automation of building fabrication is even more integrated into the construction process than it is right now.

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The Aesthetics of Automation: Examining the Appearance of 3D Printed Affordable Housing

June 12, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

The viability of 3D Printing in architecture – has, at the very least – seen a seismic shift over the past few years. Usually relegated to prototypes or conceptual models, 3D Printed building designs are increasingly being actualised as physical projects. In 2013, WinSun, a Chinese company – was able to print 10 houses in a 24-hour period, becoming one of the first companies to achieve this feat using 3D Printing technology. More recently, in 2018, a family in France became the first in the world to live in a 3D Printed house. The city of Dubai is also seeking to have a quarter of its buildings be 3D Printed by 2025. These examples display the upwards category of this technology, and how it is very likely, as the years go by, this automation of building fabrication is even more integrated into the construction process than it is right now.

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“When You Enter Architecture You Enter Another World” in Conversation With Kengo Kuma

June 5, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

Talking to the Louisiana Channel, iconic Japanese architect Kengo Kuma discusses the many influences that have shaped his work – and also delves into the impact that the ongoing pandemic has had on the architectural field. In the interview, Kuma describes how influential his early upbringing was to his architectural career. Growing up in a small wooden house in the 1950s – originally built in 1942, would go on to guide his architectural perchance of using wood in his projects. Kuma also mentions Japanese architect Kenzu Tange as a key inspiration and cites Tange’s Yoyogi National Gymnasium – constructed for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo – as a project that would influence him towards an architectural career.

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Architect Michel Rojkind on the Social Responsibility of Design

June 4, 2021 Matthew Maganga 0

In a Design and the City episode – a podcast by reSITE on how to make cities more liveable – Mexican architect Michel Rojkind talks about running, coming from a musical background, and the responsibility of architects to create buildings that can “give something relevant” back to the community. The interview delves into Rojkind’s philosophy of making sure that architectural conversations are not insular, but instead conversations that take place within a multi-disciplinary context.