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Monte da Caliça House / A+

August 2, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

The ‘Monte Alentejano’ is a vernacular housing type found all over the Portuguese Alentejo. These ‘houses’ have a simple saddle pitch roof, an imposing chimney and generally sit as a long volume on the top of the hill (hence the name ‘monte’). The term ‘monte’ can also be used to refer not only to the main house of the farmer or the estate owner but also the outhouses and other functional buildings that were close to it.

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Torre 261 Residential Building / Just An Architect

July 28, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

Urbanistically, the plot meets two distinct scales. To the North, a scale of four and five-story buildings, to the South by the intersection of an access road to Rossio Park, after which the scale changes to a two-story scale and single-family dwelling typology.

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Residential Building by the Aqueduct / António Costa Lima Arquitectos

July 26, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

The demolition of the pre-existing warehouse and the construction of this new building on a backed plan allows uncovering a section of the Águas Livres Aqueduct, called Galeria da Esperança. This initiative reveals the urgent safeguard that this monument lacks in its parallel route to the São Bento Street since it’s sunk in the hillside under a number of buildings.

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Casa da Volta / PROMONTORIO + João Cravo

July 22, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

The house is located in the Southwest of Alentejo, deep in the Grandola hills. The gently undulating topography contrasts with the harsh dryness of the landscape and its bare vegetation of cork and holm oaks with sparse bushes creeping from the calcareous soil.

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Sand House / Studio MK27

July 22, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

There are limits, such as the ocean, that appear to our eyes and soul like boundless openings. When confronted with these powerful natural elements, architecture must also open itself and project towards the limit. The house on the Sand, with its extraordinary view to the Atlantic Ocean in the northeast of Brazil, undertakes this venture. 

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Bus Terminal of São Luís / Natureza Urbana

July 21, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

The architectural firm Natureza Urbana is responsible for an extensive urban revitalization of a Bus Terminal located in the historic center of São Luís, in Maranhão, bringing as design precepts the intention of qualifying public spaces, improving the interconnection with the existing heritage, and boosting the activity of local micro-entrepreneurs. Manoela Machado and Pedro Lira, partners at Natureza Urbana, were the architects responsible for the project; also, the company Hproj Planejamento e Projetos worked in partnership with Natureza Urbana, with financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

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Bus Terminal of São Luís / Natureza Urbana

July 21, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

The architectural firm Natureza Urbana is responsible for an extensive urban revitalization of a Bus Terminal located in the historic center of São Luís, in Maranhão, bringing as design precepts the intention of qualifying public spaces, improving the interconnection with the existing heritage, and boosting the activity of local micro-entrepreneurs. Manoela Machado and Pedro Lira, partners at Natureza Urbana, were the architects responsible for the project; also, the company Hproj Planejamento e Projetos worked in partnership with Natureza Urbana, with financing from the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

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Ground Floor House / oitoo

July 20, 2021 Susanna Moreira 0

We’re not worried about the historic centre. There, the issue of ground-floor use is something else altogether. It works, whether we like that global brands and souvenir shops have overtaken the touristic streets of most European cities, or not. As soon as one moves away from the old Baixa, it’s impossible to remain indifferent to the vast succession of empty shop windows of closed businesses, walled and boarded up and for sale signs. Soon, one reaches the conclusion that this is not a local problem or due to poor location, street importance, and building typology. The problem doesn’t seem to be any of those factors, but rather ourselves. We, as citizens and consumers, are the problem and the reason why ground floors everywhere remain empty, underused, and waiting.