AD Classics: Smith House / Richard Meier & Partners


© Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

Five decades ago, Carole Smith called Richard Meier and told him about a site in Darien, Connecticut that she had bought with her husband. This was a rocky piece of land with dense evergreens and coastal outcrops. A dramatic slope at the back of the plot gave way to the Long Island Sound and a small, sandy cove. Carole wanted to place her weekend home on this particular site and she commissioned Richard Meier to design the house for her. At that time, he was just 31.

The Smith House was built between 1965-1967 by Richard Meier & Partners Architects. Richard Meier recalls of the residence that would later propel his career as an architect: ““I was working out of one room of a two-room apartment shortly after leaving the office of Marcel Breuer. One day I had a call from Carole Smith asking if I would be interested in designing a weekend house for her in Darien, Connecticut. She was looking for a young architect who would give full attention to her house.”

When Meier arrived on-site, he realized that the original plan for a sprawling ranch house would be the most expensive type to build: the land’s foundation was almost entirely rock, and excavation costs would put the project’s budget over the top. Instead, Meier opted to extend vertically instead of horizontally, so that it would be both more cost-effective and more spatially interesting, given the rocky, coastal landscape. This was the beginning of the design process.


Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Meier wanted to create a programmatic separation between public and private areas. This is also how the house maintains some element of enigmatic mystery and surprise. Whereas most houses put on a welcoming show on the front and have their private rooms enclosed in the rear, Smith House takes an opposite route. The street-facing side of the house, where visitors enter, appears as an unassuming opaque white box punctured with dark glass openings. This is the private side of the house, encompassing a series of “closed, cellular spaces.”


© Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

The journey through the house is an unconventional one, shifting from the private rooms to an expansive public space at the rear. To enhance the house’s spaciousness and height, Meier framed the open façade at the back such that a visitor’s vision is bounded only by the sky above and the water right at the bottom


© Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

Courtesy of Richard Meier & Partners Architects

“There is a formal layering, giving a sense of progression, as one moves across the site from the entrance road down to the shore, and the ‘line of progression’ determines the major site axis,” Meier has written. “Perpendicular to this axis, the intersecting planes in the house respond to the rhythms of the slope, trees, rock outcroppings, and the shoreline.”

The rear façade uses enormous glass pieces, some measuring up to three-storeys high. Enclosed within the glass shell, the ground and upper levels appear as slabs fastened by white mullions.


View of the Living Room washed aglow with the light and refractions from the Connecticut shore. Image © Mike Schwartz

View of the Living Room washed aglow with the light and refractions from the Connecticut shore. Image © Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

“Suspended between the chimney and the steel structural columns, the glazed wall creates a subtle tension that draws the occupant across the living space to the outside,” said Richard Meier’s firm in a press release. “The balustrades of the lower and upper levels are set back from the glass, amplifying that tension.”

Chuck Smith recounted growing up in a Richard Meier-designed house. “I can’t believe it’s been 50 years since I first experienced the Smith House. I was only five years old then, but the childlike wonder I felt then comes back to me every time I walk up the ramp, inside the door, and feel Richard Meier’s design.”


Mr. Chuck Smith looking out at the view from Smith House. Image © Mike Schwartz

Mr. Chuck Smith looking out at the view from Smith House. Image © Mike Schwartz

At a time when design in America was more conservative, the suburban dwelling stood out for being so open and inviting. A September 1968 issue of House Beautiful described the house as a “lighthouse on the shore.”


© Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

50 years later, Richard Meier’s Smith House has come to define the architectural language and design philosophy of his firm. Meier changed Smith’s initial idea of a splayed-out ranch house to the distinct vertical volume that it is now: a three-sided glass shell with an opaque white front that inserts itself into the natural landscape. 

The house is has a compact shape with clearly defined prisms and clear glazing that gathers the reflections of the interior and natural landscape, colluding them into inseparable images. Meier performed additions and subtractions on the main cubic volume, and the resultant white walls, geometric design, and layered use of glass have become Meier’s trademark style.

In comments to the press, Meier described the house and his way of looking at the space within:


© Mike Schwartz

© Mike Schwartz

“In the Smith House, as in every house that we design there is a search for clarity and for a basic geometric form. This geometry helps to create certain areas of compression, energizing tensions between openness and closure, between solid and void, between opacity and transparency. The intention in every building is rendered graphic by this geometric ordering of pace developed in a way that is always related to scale, to human scale and to the struggle to make the wholeness of the architecture clear, lucid, lyrical, and real.”

In the five decades that have passed since Smith House was built, both the internal and external life of the house has remained largely unaltered. In the newer photographs taken by Mike Schwartz, white paint on the brick chimney has started to chip away, revealing spots of red below that give the home some age and character.

Both the building and the architect have been distinguished with honors in the 50 years since the project was built. Smith House was awarded AIA’s Twenty-five year award, conferred to projects that have stood the test of time and continue to set standards of excellence for their design and significance. Richard Meier won the Pritzker Prize; at 49, he was the youngest architect to receive his profession’s highest accolade. 

Meier is also founder of Richard Meier & Partners. Among its best known works are: this very house, the Smith House in Darien, Connecticut; the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California; the United States Courthouse in Islip, New Yorkthe Atheneum in New Harmony, Indiana, and the Douglass House in Harbor Springs. The later was added to the Natonal Register of Historic Places.