New university buildings form a spatial framing, where the park is the unifying element. The square is enriched with small landscape interventions, and facilitates external business activities. (Illustration by Beauty and the Bit). Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

New university buildings form a spatial framing, where the park is the unifying element. The square is enriched with small landscape interventions, and facilitates external business activities. (Illustration by Beauty and the Bit). Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

KOHT Arkitekter has won an international competition to expand one of Norway’s s largest university campuses. The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim launched their masterplan competition in December last year, setting the deadline for the first stage in January 2017. The emerging studio, consisting of Anders Olivarius Bjærneseth (27), Kenneth Larssen Lønning (25), Jonas Velken Kverneland (27) and Christopher Wilkens (32) beat 39 competing proposals before winning in the two-stage competition.

Trondheim is the third largest city in Norway, and home to some of the country’s leading science, technology and medical institutions including various campuses of the NTNU, Sør Trøndelag University College and St Olavs University Hospital. The brief for the new proposal was to create a conceptual new structure for the campus while integrating existing facilities within the competition area. The area to be transformed is west of the existing main campus in Gløshaugen, totaling 120,000 square meters.


New additions include a campus library, not included in the competitions initial footprint (Illustration by Beauty and the Bit). Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

New additions include a campus library, not included in the competitions initial footprint (Illustration by Beauty and the Bit). Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

The proposal substantiates the intention to create a unifying campus. The academic community is unified, and the concentration of the overall structure is making the campus accessible with short distances between these different communities stated the jury in their concluding report.


North Lift. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

North Lift. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Promenade. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Promenade. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

KOHT Arkitekter’s proposal seeks to open up Gløshaugen “inward facing” campus, turning westward facing buildings outward towards the city. By opening the site’s prominent west front by a series of sloping walkways and crossings, as well as accessible promenades throughout the campus park the design aims to create good living space by cultivating existing qualities in the city. Additions include a library, a Technology and University Centre and new residential housing.


Elgeseter Park. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Elgeseter Park. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Technology and University Centre, Innovation Square. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Technology and University Centre, Innovation Square. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

By transforming Klæbuveien to an urban street with a diverse program, the proposal contributes to an active interaction between the university and the city – Competition Jury.


Towards the campus' main building. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Towards the campus' main building. Image Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

Courtesy of KOHT Arkitekter

The expansion of the university is planned to take place between 2016-2025.

New year, new competitions! We're ready for you, 2017. #architecture #competition #censored #happynewyear

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West Slope

West Slope

News via: KOHT Arkitekter.