Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Hong Kong based architecture firm Cheongvogl has won an international competition to build the Yeoui-Naru Ferry Terminal in Seoul, South Korea. Founded by Judy Cheung and Christoph Vogl in 2008, the international practice aspires to “touch human hearts with poetic senses” through their projects. With that in mind, their winning design impressed an illustrious jury including architects Ryue Nishizawa (SANAA, Nishizawa, and Associates) and Alejandro Zaera Polo of APML. Using an approach called “Poetic Pragmatism” – the design aims to enhance the flatness and monochrome characteristics of the Han River site through its architecture. The masterplan connects the entire design to the city’s existing infrastructure while creating a sense of place along the riverbank.

The masterplan together with the Yeoui-Naru Ferry Terminal creates social and environmental relevance by responding to programmatic and contextual relationships, as structures and functions are treated as a coherent entity to establish Yeoui-Naru’s new cultural identity – Cheongvogl.


Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

The Yeoui-Naru Ferry Terminal is a single story with a height of 5m, “forming a thin line following the river flow.” The decision to extend the terminal using only one floor maximizes efficiency by spreading the facilities over a greater area. Its slender footprint will provide spaces for up to seven 700 tons vessels to berth at the same time, as well as 20 private boats, tour boats, and transport vessels.


Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

The wavy character of the terminal is optimized for maneuvering vessels, and its location away from the shoreline enhances the experience of “walking on Han River.” The continuous, undulating roof that shelters the Yeoui-Naru Ferry Terminal and marina corresponds with the flow of the river and “creates a poetic interpretation of Yeoui-Naru symbolic identity.” Views of the river and city are framed from openings within the roof design.


Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Timber cladding and lightweight steel frames make up the principal structure of the Yeoui-Naru Ferry Terminal. Instead of using balustrades, a metal mesh will enclose the periphery of the marina creating an “almost invisible curtain” effect. The use of a semi-transparent mesh disintegrates the threshold between river and pier, as described by Cheongvogl:


Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

The slender pier structure is wide enough to provide visitors with a feeling of comfort and security on the floating platform. At the same time it is narrow enough to create the unique experience of “walking on the Han River”. While the areas and dimensions are highly optimized, the result is a structure, which allows visitors to experience an intense connection with the flowing river.


Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

The terminal and marina facilities will be connected to the Yeoui-Naru Station via a link bridge, which provides a barrier-free connection to the new development and public transportation facilities.


Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Courtesy of CHEUNGVOGL

Further built additions to the masterplan include a Yeouijeong (Pier Deck) and a cultural center.  The pier deck, following the terminal, will also be one-storey. An open timber structure with shutters facing the terminal and marina facilities, it is conceptualized as a market hall typology with cafes/restaurants in flexible enclosed, open and semi-open spaces. The enclosures are temporary flexible structures, prepared for any future expansions and changes while being cost-effective to secure, maintain and replace due to flooding. The 8,500 sqm rooftop of the Yeouijeong will be a vast observation platform, overseeing the Han River and the marina facilities. The 4-storey landmark “Ari Cultural Center,” to be located on the southeast corner of the masterplan aims to be “a strong anchor point to connect the entire cultural development with the urban grain.”

The project is anticipated to be completed in 2019.

  • Architects: Cheungvogl
  • Location: Yeoui-Naru, Seoul, South Korea
  • Competition Jury: Ryue Nishizawa – Office of Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA (Sejima and Nishizawa and Associates), Alejandro Zaera Polo – AZPML, Professor Choi Moongyu – Yonsei University, Professor Choi JeongKwon – Gachon University, Professor Park SunWoo – Korea National University of Arts, Professor Shim Jaehyeon – Sejong University
  • Area: 0.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017

News via: Cheongvogl

Vincent Callebaut Imagines Hyperbolic Shaped Forest Suspended Over River in Seoul

Vincent Callebaut Architectures have developed a design plan reimagining the riverbank of Yeouhido Park, Seoul. The park is envisioned as an experimental urban space dedicated to sustainable development through a series of interventions – including a floating ferry terminal.