Ghat House / Max Núñez


© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe
  • Architects: Max Núñez
  • Location: Zapallar, Chile
  • Associate Architect: Stefano Rolla
  • Area: 390.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Roland Halbe
  • Structural Engineering: Mauricio Ahumada
  • Building Contractor: Francisco Álvarez
  • Landscape Design: Alejandra Marambio
  • Lighting Design: Estudio Par
  • Technical Inspection: Alfonso Bravo

© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe

Text description provided by the architects. The house is located on a terrain that has a 25o inclination, facing the Pacific Ocean. Its design, structure, internal organization, and the lifestyle proposed within it were determined by the pre- existing conditions of the topography.


© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe

The inclined surface of the roof is parallel to the natural slope of the site and it’s occupied by a large stair with unusual proportions for a domestic program. Below this oblique plane a diagonal interior space contains the different programs of the house. The monotony of the free plan is redefined by the slope, creating an interior topography of varying levels with different sizes and heights.


© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe

The roof is supported by 15 concrete columns with different sizes and shapes. Their geometry was determined by their structural needs and its heterogeneous shapes manage to individualize each column as a singular element, avoiding the reading of a rigid structural grid ordering the plan. Each column generates a particular point in space and the framing of the landscape between them is always diverse.


Courtesy of Max Núñez

Courtesy of Max Núñez

Axonometric

Axonometric

Courtesy of Max Núñez

Courtesy of Max Núñez

Four lighter volumes cladded in wood interfere with the surface of the roof and the space below it. Three of these volumes contain the private rooms, and the fourth, smaller in dimensions, contains a direct access to the roof from the inside. These volumes are located under, beside, and above the roof, establishing ambiguous relations between the private and public areas of the house.


© Roland Halbe

© Roland Halbe