sogoojae / DIDI studio

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© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

  • Architects: DIDI studio
  • Location: Namyangju, South Korea
  • Lead Architect: Hwi Roh
  • Team: Nari Kang, Gangkuk Lee, Hyungsuk Jung
  • Architect Of Record: Sungchul Kim ( Gado architecture)
  • Area: 563.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Text description provided by the architects. The beginning of the house began with a recollection of what we had missed rather than what we needed. Instead of worrying about the program of space, I gave priority to the fundamental question about what to feel, what to see and what to listen to. Civilization devices such as TVs and computers are minimized or hidden in order to stay away from artificial things. Instead, we made it possible to see nature everywhere, create eaves to hear the falling rain, and create a shady yard where we could feel the wind. That is, the experience was designed. In the front yard, the client moved the tree that he planted in childhood from the old house. In other words, I made a place to recall time. The memorable house, which is not simply a living house, is completed on a small hill.


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Placeness
The location of the site is not easy to access, but it is still hidden in the confines of the surrounding urbanization. It is located on a small hill and maintains a very good view


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Two orientations
As the earth meets the river, the building also looks at the river. In order to solve the difference between the building direction considering the feng shui and the practical building direction, the panoramic view was taken up to the inside after superimposing the two directions. As you climb the hill, the inside of the house also climbs, making your privacy more intimate.


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Contrast
As the town becomes more and more known outside, its identity is changing. As commercial facilities enter riverside and in the village, visitors are increasing. On the road becoming increasingly crowded, it is separated from the outside by a somewhat closed nature, but on the opposite side, the river side is very open. The difference between what you see outside and what you experience inside is very clear.


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Organized Nature
The internal spaces are arranged around or surrounded by external spaces such as yards or courtyards. The small spaces in which nature comes in deeply interact with nature and building, creating heaviness and lightness, lightness and darkness, opening and closing.


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Section 04

Section 04

© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

Memory
I wanted to build a new house but familiar. The place was reinterpreted such as the warm springtime ridges, cool summer floors, moonlighting window prints, and the cold windy sound of winter nights. It was not a simple building, but a place to communicate with the past. The maple tree planted in childhood moved away from the country house and was planted here. By personifying things with memories, I brought time to the place.


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung

It was a festival to build a house. In addition to functional needs, the house became a friend as it filled the emotional thirst. We prepared festivals while carefully selecting materials and colors.


© Kwangsik Jung

© Kwangsik Jung
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